T I C K L E D P I N K
22 April 2014 @ 6:20 PM

dailylifeofadisneyfreak:

books-on-tables:

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

mrbluechalk:

radioactivepapertowns:

wizard-me-timbers:

I totally remember watching this as a kid and thinking that looked like the most delicious biscuit/cookie in the world

me too!

when in reality was’t it a ritz cracker dipped in water?

THAT’S CREME A LA CREME A LA EDGAR YOU IGNORANT SLUT

every so often I sometimes get a mug of milk, add a splash of vanilla extract, a spoonful of sugar, and a sprinkle of cinnamon and heat it in the microwave and have it with Ritz Crackers and pretend it’s Creme A La Creme A La Edgar and it’s seriously just the best.

I JUST MADE THAT MYSELF AND AM CURRENTLY HAVING RITZ CRACKERS WITH IT AND LEMME TELL YOU THIS SHIT IS DELICIOUS

SOMEONE FOUND THE RECIPE TO CREME A LA CREME A LA EDGAR

(Source: fydisneymisfits)

5 hours ago via hieayyy (originally fydisneymisfits)
22 April 2014 @ 5:40 PM

(Source: showmeyouricons)

6 hours ago via demiilauren (originally showmeyouricons)
22 April 2014 @ 5:00 PM

In 1968, Fred Astaire announced that he was giving up dancing. It coincided with the release of his last musical, Finian’s Rainbow, and his last TV special. Despite that, he was asked to dance on some occasions. Two of these, both in 1970, were the 42nd Academy Awards and an interview on the Dick Cavett show.. At the Academy Awards, Astaire stated, “There are some things that just don’t last forever.” However, he next launched into a brief dance routine that brought the house down with applause. The impression was conveyed that it was improvised, but it was all meticulously choreographed by Astaire beforehand, like all his dances. A few months later, he was challenged by Dick Cavett. “I bet you don’t dance.” He stated. Astaire got up from his seat and virtually recreated step-by-step the same routine he had danced at the Awards. By that point, he was 70 years old, and he had several back and knee problems. The dances caused him a lot of pain, but he did them anyway, thus showing his true performer’s spirit.

(Source: astairical)

6 hours ago via maryhartleys (originally astairical)
22 April 2014 @ 4:20 PM
7 hours ago via cerseilannasster (originally darlinghepburn)
22 April 2014 @ 3:40 PM
nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.

nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.

8 hours ago via ava--gardner (originally nextyearsgirl)
21 April 2014 @ 6:20 PM

(Source: tyrells)

1 day ago via branstarks (originally tyrells)
21 April 2014 @ 5:40 PM

(Source: cinyma)

1 day ago via maryhartleys (originally cinyma)
21 April 2014 @ 5:00 PM
─ we’re flawed because we want so much more. we’re ruined because we get these things and wish for what we had.
1 day ago via madgiffing (originally madgiffing)
21 April 2014 @ 4:20 PM

"The combination of their beauty was staggering. Elizabeth was hypnotically beautiful – almost embarrassingly so. She was a perfect, voluptuous little doll. And those great violet eyes fringed by double lashes. But there was an enigmatic power and magnetism behind her looks which gave her beauty – and his – a sultry depth. One could see her as a goddess, mother, seductress, wife. One could see him as prince, saint, and madman." -Diana Lynn

"The combination of their beauty was staggering. Elizabeth was hypnotically beautiful – almost embarrassingly so. She was a perfect, voluptuous little doll. And those great violet eyes fringed by double lashes. But there was an enigmatic power and magnetism behind her looks which gave her beauty – and his – a sultry depth. One could see her as a goddess, mother, seductress, wife. One could see him as prince, saint, and madman." -Diana Lynn

(Source: damelizabeth)

1 day ago via normajeanebaker (originally damelizabeth)
21 April 2014 @ 3:40 PM

Elizabeth Taylor fixing her hair on the set of Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967)

(Source: damnedfromheretoeternity)

1 day ago via bellecs (originally damnedfromheretoeternity)